WOMEN’S SKATING

BlogBy:Riya Rathore

The Exposure Skate 2016, the premier female skateboarding event in the world, held in Southern California each November since 2012. This year’s competition featured 171 amateurs and pros from all over the world, competing on three types of courses: vert, bowl and street. Vert, short for vertical ramp, is similar in many ways to a snowboard halfpipe, and the “bowl” is just what it sounds like — a giant bowl that skaters stay inside. Street involves tricks in public spaces like down stairs and on railings.2006 Olympic Figure Skating Champion Shizuka Arakawa is Japan’s first ever ladies figure skating Olympic Champion. Arakawa was 24 when she won the Olympic figure skating title. That made her the oldest women’s Olympic figure skating champion since 1908 Olympic Figure Skating Champion Florence “Madge” Cave Syers, who won at 27. Kim Yuna is a South Korean former figure skater. She is the 2010 Olympic champion and 2014 silver medalist in ladies’ singles; the 2009, 2013 World champion; the 2009 Four Continents champion; a three-time Grand Prix Final champion; the 2006 World Junior champion; the 2005 Junior Grand Prix FinalKatarina Witt is a retired German figure skater. Witt won two Olympic gold medals for East Germany, first at the 1984 Sarajevo Olympics and the second in 1988 at the Calgary Olympics. She is a four-time World champion and twice World silver medalist. A feat only equalled by Sonja Henie among femaleMichelle Wingshan Kwan is an American figure skater. She is also noted for her conflict with Tonya Harding. Most skaters and many non-skaters knows what Street League Skateboarding is.

The professional skateboarding competition has been running since 2010, but it was only this year in Chicago that they included a women’s division for the first time. After years of sitting in the sidelines or being included in comps without the promo or paycheck, here was a chance for women to finally skate for a mass audience—and on a massive platform.Lacey Baker, who placed fourth in this year’s Street League, begs to differ. Widely held to be one of the best female street and technical skaters of all time—in 2013, Thrasher Magazine named her first full part in a skate video one of the best female street/tech parts ever—Baker claims that she doesn’t even cut enough competition checks to justify a full time career. Now the 24 year old says that she feels let down and rejected by the same skate scene that thrived off her decades-long participation