Eating healthier at the office

Blog by: Suryakant Tripathi.

1. Out of sight, out of mind. Research shows that it’s much easier to avoid that dreaded workplace candy bowl when you can’t actually see it. In a study by Brian Wansink, author of the book Mindless Eating, people were 70 percent more likely to eat from the candy dish at work when it was transparent versus when the jar was opaque. If you have a candy dish on your desk, either put it in a jar that you can’t see through, or—better yet–get rid of it all together. Follow this principle with all unhealthy foods at work: Close the lid on that donut box, move the plate of bagels off the conference table and into the break room (where other co-workers will quickly gobble them up), and talk an alternate route so you don’t have to walk past the candy dish in reception.

2. Set a calendar reminder for your H2O. A healthy diet isn’t just about food. Did you know that even being slightly dehydrated can leave you feeling tired and sluggish? Thirst can also masquerade as hunger, making it harder for you to stick to your healthy-eating plan. To avoid this, set a reminder on your calendar to pop up every 30 minutes. Every time you hear that reminder, have a few big gulps of water so that you’re properly hydrated.

3. Keep a list of go-to restaurants with healthy options. You know how it goes. You pack a deliciously healthy meal when, all of a sudden, your biggest client wants to go out for lunch. What’s a SparkPerson to do? Research! Write out a list of restaurants around your workplace that have healthy options (you may have to look them up online). Then, the next time you’re surprised with a lunch offer, you can recommend dining at a place that you know has healthy food that you like. Not able to pick the restaurant? Follow these tips!

4. Make the vending machine a no-go zone. If you really struggle with junk food or soda from the vending machines at work, the first step is to commit to avoiding the vending machine. (Remember, you packed healthy snacks to nosh on!) The next step is out of sight, out of mind. If possible, try not to walk by the vending machines at all. If you have to pass by them, don’t look at them, and walk quickly past them. You might even consider not keeping loose change or bills in your wallet so that you won’t be able to buy from the vending machine in a weak moment. Another idea is to set up a reward system. Give yourself a dollar (or the amount you’d usually spend) for every day you successfully avoid the vending machine. In a few weeks, treat yourself to a fun reward like a manicure, a new book, or something else you love (that’s not junk food!) with the money you’ve saved. Before you know it, the vending machine will lose its appeal altogether.

5. Indulge in your absolute favorites—and savor every bite. By no means should you never eat junk food or donuts at work again! When something is really calling your name, or a special event is going on, go ahead and indulge. Keep your portions in check. Savor every bite, eating slowly and fully enjoying the experience. Afterwards, get right back to your usual healthy eating plan. Just don’t fall into the trap of indulging at every “special event” at the office, because those special days tend to come up quite often (it always seems to be somebody’s birthday in an office setting!).

For more details visit http://www.bfysportsnfitness.com

Diet plan for professional working in shifts.

Blog by: Suryakant Tripathi.

When you’re working a shift schedule, your eating and exercise habits can suffer. People who work shifts sometimes skip meals, eat irregularly, eat unhealthy food, and may find it hard to keep up a regular exercise schedule. Shift workers are at higher risk for weight gain and heart disease as well. Healthy eating and exercise help improve your sleep and your overall health. These ten easy tips can help you stay healthy even with an irregular or shift work schedule.

  • Have healthy foods readily available at home and at work. People who are sleepy are more likely to reach for unhealthy foods. Stock your kitchen with easy-to-eat raw vegetables (baby carrots, apple slices) and hummus, fruits (bananas, oranges), or a container of raw almonds and raisins (versus a muffin or cookies), so that when you’re tired but hungry, you make healthy food choices. If you like carbs, consider whole grains and “slow burning” foods like brown rice, wild rice, and rolled oats that keep you full and productive for longer stretches.
  • Prepare meals before your shift, so they’re ready to eat when you get home. Experiment with crock pot meals (which can cook foods over a long period of time) or try freezing portion sizes of your favorite healthy meals for easy access when you don’t have time to cook.
  • Bring your own food to work. You’re more likely to eat healthily if you pack your own meals rather than eating foods from restaurants, take out counters or vending machines.
  • Eat small, frequent meals as opposed to large heavy ones. Heavy meals often have more calories than most people need in one sitting. Eating a large portion can also make you feel sluggish or tired while on the job.
  • Try to eat in line with a regular day. It’s hard to stick to a regular diet if you eat very late at night or throughout a shift.
  • Sit down to eat. Pause for meals. Eat at a relaxed pace. Eating on the go or in front of a computer encourages mindless snacking.
  • Moderate your caffeine consumption. Limit caffeine intake four to five hours before the end of your shift (caffeine stays in your body for many hours) to help your body wind down for home and relaxation.
  • Drink plenty of fluids. Your body often signals hunger and thirst in the same way. Bring a water bottle to work and fill it often. Not only will you save money on bottled drinks, but you’ll treat your body as well. Infuse your water with fruit or a citrus slice for an added flavor boost without the calories.
  • Exercise moderately. Try to take walks, walk up and down stairs, or stretch before or after your shift or during your breaks. People who exercise not only burn more calories during the day, but they sleep better as well.
  • Get the sleep you need. People who sleep the recommended seven to nine hours each day are healthier, fitter, and less likely to suffer from obesity or other health issues than those who don’t sleep well. Remember that you can space out sleep with naps if a single period of rest isn’t possible with your schedule.

For more details visit http://www.bfysportsnfitness.com

6 Sure-Fire Tricks To Improve Your Diet At Work

Blog by: Suryakant Tripathi.

You rush off with no breakfast. By morning tea time you’re onto your third coffee. Since it’s a tea break you go for a large creamy latté and a big muffin.

Lunch rolls around and you grab something quickly without thinking. By afternoon you’re feeling tired and groggy, so you go hit the snack box or vending machine and gulp down a Red Bull…
Welcome to the busy working lifestyle – where the combination of poor nutrition and high stress make for a sick and tired person – and most probably overweight as well.

So what are some easy ways to improve your work diet?

Don’t Skip Breakfast
Sure you’ve heard it all before – but this time you have to make it work for you. If you are not hungry when you wake or simply cannot make the time – why not set up some breakfast food at work?
I’ve known many a colleague who will fix themselves some breakfast in the staff/tea room. Most offices will have at least a fridge and a microwave oven. No excuses there.

Throw Some Fruit in Your Bag
This was role-modeled for me many years ago. A dedicated and fit workmate always had 3 pieces of fruit sitting on his desk. The fruit was always consumed by the end of the day. It rubbed off on me so I began bringing in fruit. I’ve never looked back.
You don’t have to keep reaching for the vending machine.

Get Out of The Office
I’ve always been amazed at the folks who stay in the office for the entire day.
Plan to get out at lunch time – go for a walk – clear your head – and make time to eat. If you plan ahead of time then you won’t be pulled into any sudden jobs or meetings.

Stock Up Your Desk
Most people tend to eat whatever is in front of them. Once you get the munchies – any food will become fair game.
If you’ve got some better options nearby – the chances are you will eat better. Here are some food ideas:

Small packets of nuts.
Small tins of tuna or salmon
Small cans of beans
Rice Crackers
Whole-wheat pitas
In the fridge you could have some hummus or cottage cheese, or even sliced meats.
You have enough there to make up a lunch or snack.
Coffee Overdose
What can be said about coffee? Our entire civilization would collapse without this drug. Some of us consume so much of it during our work day – that we end up strung out and fatigued – not realizing that it could be the coffee to blame. Keep tabs on this.
I frequently go through seasons of substituting green tea or herbal tea when my coffee consumption starts going up. Colleagues might look at you funny when you pour yourself some green tea with lemon – but that’s their problem.

The Dinner Trap
Let’s say you have lunch at 1pm, and dinner at 7pm. That’s a fairly long stretch. Instead of starving and then demolishing an enormous meal of pasta – it’s better to have a good snack in between.
Don’t be afraid to leave food on your plate at dinner time. Most of us are used to big carb-heavy evening meals. Make a habit of leaving food on your plate – you never know – you might just have made tomorrows lunch.

For more details visit http://www.bfysportsnfitness.com

Fitness plans for working professionals.

Blog by: Suryakant Tripathi.

1. The Patient Printer
The boss lady just requested that a 200-page presentation be printed “perfectly.” Why lackadaisically stand by the printing pages when you could be sculpting your calves with calf raises? Standing with feet shoulder-width apart, press up onto the tippy toes, pause at the top, then lower back down. Repeat for three sets of 12-15 reps, or until the printing, faxing, or scanning is done. Ready to level up? Try raising only one leg at a time.

2. The Silent Seat Squeeze
Believe it or not, some deskercises can be kept under wraps, and this isometric glutes exercise is one of them. To start toning, simply squeeze the buttocks, hold for 5-10 seconds, and release. Repeat until the agenda wraps up or the glutes tire. The results will be uplifting in more ways than one.

3. The Seated Leg Raiser
When pay raises are nowhere to be seen, consider the leg raise. (Bonus: they’re hardly noticeable underneath the desk!) While seated, straighten one or both legs and hold in place for five or more seconds. Then lower the leg(s) back to the ground without letting the feet touch the floor. Repeat (alternating legs if raising them separately) for 15 reps. Underwhelmed? Loop a purse or briefcase strap over the ankle for added weight, or for more of an abs workout, add a crunch.

4. The Desk Squat
Mastered the art of standing around? Add a squat! Start standing with feet together (and the desk chair pushed out of the way). Bend the knees slightly so the thighs are almost parallel to the ground, as if sitting in a chair. As you bend, raise the arms straight up or towards the computer screen. Keep the knees together and aligned. Hold for 15 seconds and release. Repeat.

5. The Lunch Break Hammy
Strengthen the hamstrings with this standing leg curl. Stand behind your chair and hold onto it for support. Gently kick one foot back, aiming the heel for the top of your thigh. Lower the foot back down and repeat exercise with the other leg. Do 10 reps, take a bite of your lunchtime sandwich, and then do 10 more.

For more details visit http://www.bfysportsnfitness.com

Healthy diet

Blog by: Suryakant Tripathi.

Work. It’s where most of us spend the majority of our weeks. While that realization can be somewhat depressing, it also shows how your habits at work have a huge effect on your weight-loss goals. Sure, the office can be full of temptation–whether the vending machine calls your name at 3 p.m., or your boss brings in glazed donuts every Monday morning–but your workplace can actually be a place that supports your healthy lifestyle. You just have to know how to work the system.

Ways to Stop Your Workplace from Derailing Your Diet

1. Use the workday structure to work with your diet–not against it. The great thing about being at work on a regular schedule is that you have built-in structure for your day. While you may not know exactly what stress is coming your way, you probably know when regular meetings are held and when deadlines are approaching. So, just like you would for any other important assignment at work, get organized! Set aside time to eat a healthy snack or mindfully enjoy lunch without distractions, if possible. (Eating while you work is one sure-fire way to mindlessly eat out of stress!) View your planned snacks and lunchtime as any other important to-do on your list!

2. Find a weight-loss ally (or 20). We all know how important it is to have a weight-loss buddy in our social lives, and the same holds true at work. Tell your closest co-workers about your commitment to stick with a healthy diet , and see if they’ll join you. If you have a good relationship with your boss, why not tell him or her about your goals? Don’t be shy in reminding your superiors that studies have demonstrated healthy employees are more cost effective and productive. Before you know it, you might have everyone at your workplace changing their ways!

3. Pack your meals and snacks. Preparation is the name of the game when it comes to eating right at work. Pack a small cooler each day full of fresh fruits, vegetables, lean proteins and whole grains. It’s good to bring a variety of options so that you can eat what sounds good to you at the time (this helps you from not feeling overly deprived or “stuck” with what you brought), and the extras come in handy if you have to work late. You might have to get up earlier to pack yourself a lunch and snacks, but after you start to eat better and feel better at work, you’ll see that it’s worth the extra time. For lunch and snack ideas, be sure to check out SparkRecipes.

4. Keep an emergency stash. For days when you forget your cooler, or find that your snack didn’t quiet the hunger monster after that early-morning Spinning class, it’s a good idea to have a drawer in your desk full of non-perishable, healthy snacks. Easy go-to options are protein bars, snack portions of trail mix or nuts, beef jerky, and even instant or canned soup. It’s best to pick items that are healthy, but not so tasty that you keep thinking about them all day long. So choose foods you like, but don’t consider a treat. Remember, this is about preparation–not feeding your sweet/salty tooth (more on that later!).

5. Practice your most assertive and nicest “No, thank you.” Almost everyone can name a food-pusher at work. Whether it’s the receptionist who likes to bake or the sales rep that also helps her daugher sell Girl Scout Cookies, unhealthy temptations are a part of the workplace and a part of life. If you’ve followed tip No. 2, hopefully this will stop some diet saboteurs from pushing food, but be prepared to politely say “No, thanks” when you don’t want to eat something. Thank the person and acknowledge the effort, and then move on. For co-workers who are really pushy when it comes to food.

For more details visit http://www.bfysportsnfitness.com

Simple exercise that you can perform at you Desk.

Blog by: Suryakant Tripathi.

1. The Twinkle Toe
Tap into your inner Fred Astaire by speedily tapping those toes on the floor under your desk. Or graduate to a harder (and less inconspicuous) move: Stand in front of a small trashcan and lift up those legs to tap the toes on its edge, alternating feet, in soccer-drill fashion.

2. The Stair Master
Want to avoid elevator small talk in favor of elevating the heart rate? Take the stairs! Accelerate on the straight-aways and take two at a time every other flight for a real leg burn.

3. The Slog, Then Jog
Instead of slogging away for hours nonstop, take a mini break for a stationary jog. Pop up from your chair (admire the butt imprint left behind!) and jog in place. Willing to huff and puff a little more? Pick up those knees! Continue for one minute, return to spreadsheets, and repeat.

4. The Celebratory Split Squat Jumps
Win over a new client? Figure out how to un-jam the printer? Is it finally Friday?! Celebrate with the split squat jump. With feet hip-width apart, step the left leg back two feet and balance on the ball of the foot. Next, lower into a lunge, and then accelerate upwards in an explosion of celebration. While in the air, switch feet so that the left foot is planted firmly in front and the right leg is now behind. Repeat 10-12 times on each side.

5. The Wall (Street) Sit
Wall sits are great for building strength and endurance. Standing with your back against the wall, bend the knees and slide your back down the wall until the thighs are parallel to the floor. Sit and hold for 30-60 seconds (or up to 12 hours, the world record!), while browsing the Wall Street Journal (or Buzzfeed). For some extra burn, try crossing the right ankle over the left knee, hold for 15 seconds, then switch!

6. The Last Man Standing
Sure, standing around isn’t exactly traditional exercise, but research shows it’s got more than a leg up on sitting. After all, long periods of sitting are linked to increased risk for diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease, whereas standing significantly increases your daily caloric expenditure . Stand whenever you can, and consider roping in other coworkers to have standing meetings too!

How to Get More Active During Work Hours

Blog by: Suryakant Tripathi.

A recent article in The Guardian offers several common sense tips for getting more movement into your day-to-day life, especially during work hours.

Using a pedometer will help you assess how many steps you take throughout your work day; then simply make a concerted effort to continuously increase the number of steps you take daily. Simple changes to the way you move about the office can add up, such as:

Walking across the hall to talk to a coworker instead of sending an email
Taking the stairs instead of the elevator
Parking your car further away from the entrance
Taking a longer, roundabout way to your desk

Another strategy that can help eliminate some of the sitting is to hold standing-only office meetings. This tends to discourage unnecessary discourse and make meetings more productive in less time. Making slight alterations to your individual work space can also make a difference. For example, you can:

Organize the layout of your office space in such a way that you have to stand up to reach oft-used files, the telephone, or your printer, rather than having everything within easy reach. Ideally, you’ll want to stand up at least once every 10 minutes, or more, so simply moving one or more things you frequently reach for could allow you to build this kind of movement into your regular work day.
Use an exercise ball for a chair. Unlike sitting in a chair, sitting on an exercise ball engages your core muscles and helps improve balance and flexibility. Occasional bouncing can also help your body interact with gravity to a greater degree than sitting on a stationary chair.
Alternatively, use an upright wooden chair with no armrest, which will force you to sit up straight, and encourage shifting your body more frequently than a cushy office chair.
Use a standing workstation. Standing rather than sitting while doing your work can also be a helpful option. For a demonstration on proper posture, whether you’re sitting.

Exercise that you can do in office easily.

Blog by: Suryakant Tripathi.

You absolutely love your job! It’s interesting, rewarding and challenging. It also might be hazardous to your health.

Office spaces are set up to require little movement, making it easy to gain weight. Before you know it, you’ve added 50 pounds (22.6 kilograms) on your frame. Besides increasing weight, desk jobs also increase the strain on your back, wrists, eyes and neck, and can result in a general loss of muscle tone.

Stress is another disadvantage of office work. A survey by Yale University shows that 29 percent of workers feel “quite a bit or extremely stressed at work.” [source: CDC]. This can lead to depression, cardiovascular disease, a lack of energy and other health issues.

To combat the adverse effects of the 9-to-5 routine, it’s important to exercise. But when can you find the time? Workplace workouts can help you make the most of your limited hours. With a little creativity, you can take advantage of the few minutes you have between pending deadlines and learn to exercise while you work.

For your company’s benefit, squeezing in a little exercise improves concentration and actually makes you more productive. But just in case others aren’t convinced (or you don’t want to be conspicuous), here are some exercises you can do secretly.

1. Stretching

Your department start-up meeting is a great way to prepare for the workday. It’s also a great time to get your muscles ready for your office workout with some stretches. Stretch from head to toe, beginning with the neck. Roll both shoulders forward in a circular motion. Stretch arm out with palm down.
With other hand, pull fingers down.

2. Under Desk Dynamics

Your co-workers will see you intently reading the report from yesterday’s meeting, but they won’t see you strengthening your abs and relieving your tired leg muscles.

Your co-workers will see you intently reading the report from yesterday’s meeting, but they won’t see you strengthening your abs and relieving your tired leg muscles.

Chair squats are an effective body-strengthening exercise. Sneak a few in every time you get up from your chair and sit back down.

3. High Profile Aerobics.

It’s good for your career to be seen around the office. These aerobic exercises will help to keep your weight down and your profile high.
To keep your projects and your body moving, visit colleagues rather than e-mailing them.
Drink a lot of water. Research suggests that drinking water can aid in your weight loss efforts [source: Jampolis]. Plus, the more trips to the restroom, the more calories you’ll burn. To increase the calorie count, visit a restroom further away from your desk. You might also run into some new people along the way.
Always walk fast without running. It’ll get your heart beating faster and make it look like you have somewhere important to be.
Take the stairs whenever possible instead of elevator. For a better workout, take the steps two at a time.

10 gadgets for getting fit at work

Blog by: Suryakant Tripathi.

Dumbbell Alarm Clock

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Start your workout from the instant you wake up with the Dumbbell Alarm Clock. When the alarm sounds at 6 a.m., you’ll have to do 30 reps before it will stop. Use your rage and groggy frustration to draw on strength you didn’t even know you had. Soon, your arms will be strong enough to hurl it out of the window with ease.

Tato commuter bike

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Instead of driving or taking public transit to work, get your cardio in by riding a bike. The Tato bike even has the added convenience of a cage that snugly fits many briefcases or laptop bags in the center of the frame. You could even add on one of these Travel Trac Book Caddies to get work done while you ride. Actually, on second thought, you might want to skip the book caddy if you are concerned about staying alive.

Withings Wi-Fi scale

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When you arrive at the office, the first thing you should do is analyze your progress by consulting the data collected by the Withings Wi-Fi Scale. When you weigh yourself at home on the handsome glass and aluminum scale, it automatically beams your weight and body fat analysis to own your private stats page on the internet via Wi-Fi. Now you can review the data breakdown on a work computer or an iPhone at your convenience. Just don’t leave the page up on your computer for your co-workers to see. You should be extra careful with your iPhone, too. I mean, losing data is one thing — but you never want strangers and cellphone thieves knowing how fat you are.

Gym chair

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The GymGym chair doesn’t look too far removed from popular Herman Miller style office chairs (or some sort of torture device), but it provides a complete workout in addition to an ergonomic design. Resistance bands positioned in several areas on the chair provide a full range of exercises for the arms, back, shoulders, legs and core. So, yeah — I guess you could say it is a torture device.

Champ sofa

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This piece of concept furniture from designer Tobias Fraenzel would be an excellent addition to the decor of an executive’s office. By lifting up the red cushion in the back and fixing it into position, you transform the Champ sofa into a punching bag. It would be a great workout, not to mention great for relieving stress, but explaining why your clients have a footprint on their back when they leave the office might be problematic.

Balance ball chair

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If the GymGym chair is a bit too much but you would still prefer a seating solution that provides health benefits, the Gaiam balance ball chair just might do the trick. By sitting and balancing yourself on the stability ball seat, you can improve core strength and posture. Then again, you could just pick up one of those hopper balls we all used as children and use it to bounce around the office. What employee wouldn’t respect a boss riding a smiley face hopper ball at work?

Springflex UB

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According to the product page, attaching the Springfield UBE resistance arms to your desk allows you to perform up to 120 exercises just about anywhere. I ‘m not sure about all that, but I’m pretty confident that it’s not a good idea to go shirtless with short shorts in the office.

Gamercize PC-Sport Stepper

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The Gamercize PC-Sport works like a little elliptical machine that you place under your desk, only it will hijack your mouse and keyboard when hooked up to a PC or laptop if it detects you are slowing down to unacceptable levels. In other words, you need to keep moving to stay productive. Additional software can be included to help you keep track of your workouts, but I suspect you’ll know that your endurance is improving when you start getting your work in on time.

Hand Fitness Trainer

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If you suffer from arthritis or repetitive-motion injuries as a result of your job, the Hand Fitness Trainer might be of help. It slips on like a glove and provides resistance when you open your hand — strengthening the extensor muscles in your hands, wrists and elbows, which is said to reduce the symptoms associated with maladies such as carpal tunnel, tennis elbow and tendinitis. Plus, you can freak people out when you try and give them a high-five.

For more details visit http://www.bfysportsnfitness.com